Twitter Cover Dec 2022 ScreengrabNews

December 2022 issue out now

As the FIFA World Cup 2022 gets into full swing in Qatar, the December issue of Significance sheds statistical light on events on and off the pitch. We dig into the data behind penalty shootouts and red cards, as well as the numbers behind worker deaths in the country whose human rights record has been so widely criticised. Fear not, football-phobics ­– this issue also investigates the role of machine learning in protecting vulnerable children, explains how stats can prevent blackouts, and celebrates the 60th anniversary of the Statistical Society of Australia, with profiles of four inspiring members past and present.

By Anna Britten

Twitter Cover Dec 2022 ScreengrabNews

December 2022 issue out now

As the FIFA World Cup 2022 gets into full swing in Qatar, the December issue of Significance sheds statistical light on events on and off the pitch. We dig into the data behind penalty shootouts and red cards, as well as the numbers behind worker deaths in the country whose human rights record has been so widely criticised. Fear not, football-phobics ­– this issue also investigates the role of machine learning in protecting vulnerable children, explains how stats can prevent blackouts, and celebrates the 60th anniversary of the Statistical Society of Australia, with profiles of four inspiring members past and present.

  By Anna Britten

Science

10 women statisticians and data scientists who helped us understand Covid-19

Effective communication was vital during the pandemic, and expert voices were needed to help the public find their way through a jungle of complex and frightening information. To coincide with...

By Elpida Vounzoulaki

News

Women of Significance?

Significance bills itself as “a magazine about statistics and data science, written by experts for everyone”. But too few of its featured experts are women, as an analysis by Karen...

By Anna Britten

Mathematician Hannah Fry, an auburn haired woman in a blue suit smiling into the cameraScience

10 women statisticians and data scientists who helped us understand Covid-19

Effective communication was vital during the pandemic, and expert voices were needed to help the public find their way through a jungle of complex and frightening information. To coincide with the October special issue of Significance, and the first International Day of Women in Statistics and Data Science, Elpida Vounzoulaki highlights the contributions and achievements of some of the women statisticians, epidemiologists, mathematicians and data scientists who helped us understand the impact of Covid-19. There are, of course, many more than we had room for ­- and we salute every one.

  By Elpida Vounzoulaki

Photo of magazines on shelvingNews

Women of Significance?

Significance bills itself as “a magazine about statistics and data science, written by experts for everyone”. But too few of its featured experts are women, as an analysis by Karen Lamb, Jessica Kasza, Sophie Calabretto, Rushani Wijesuriya and Linda McIver shows.

  By Anna Britten

Campaign pollstersPolitics

Forecast error: 2022 French presidential election predictors

In 2022 Emmanuel Macron, the President of the French Republic, sought re-election against opponents of various political persuasions. The challenge for Macron was to win another five-year term against a background of post-Brexit readjustment and the Ukraine crisis. The challenge for me, as the author of this article, was to see whether techniques adapted to Anglo-American partisan elections (see here and here) would cope with a Francophone election with different traditions.

  By Timothy Martyn Hill

Campaign pollsters

 

Politics

Forecast error: 2022 French presidential election predictors

In 2022 Emmanuel Macron, the President of the French Republic, sought re-election against opponents of various political persuasions. The challenge for Macron was to win another five-year term against a background of post-Brexit readjustment and the Ukraine crisis. The challenge for me, as the author of this article, was to see whether techniques adapted to Anglo-American partisan elections (see here and here) would cope with a Francophone election with different traditions.

By Timothy Martyn Hill

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