US courtroomScience

Statistics in court: Incorrect probabilities

Although both the law and statistical theory have foundations that rest on formal rules and principles, courts can badly misapply statistical evidence and arguments. In some cases, even when arriving at a correct decision, the courts can accept or give an explanation that is inaccurate and unsound. In other cases, the misuse of statistics has led to false convictions and years of jail time for crimes not committed by the accused.

By Jim Norton and George Divine

US courtroomScience

Statistics in court: Incorrect probabilities

Although both the law and statistical theory have foundations that rest on formal rules and principles, courts can badly misapply statistical evidence and arguments. In some cases, even when arriving at a correct decision, the courts can accept or give an explanation that is inaccurate and unsound. In other cases, the misuse of statistics has led to false convictions and years of jail time for crimes not committed by the accused.

  By Jim Norton and George Divine

Culture

Statistics in court: An interview with a juror

Statisticians have a crucial role to play in ensuring fairness and justice in the legal system, particularly where the assessment and interpretation of forensic evidence is concerned (see our...

By Kelly H. Zou

News

Evidence of uncertainty: An introduction to our April 2019 special issue

In the heyday of television shows like CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, forensic science seemed not only high-tech and glamorous, but also simple and straightforward. Viewers would watch as the...

By Brian Tarran

Jury boxCulture

Statistics in court: An interview with a juror

Statisticians have a crucial role to play in ensuring fairness and justice in the legal system, particularly where the assessment and interpretation of forensic evidence is concerned (see our April 2019 special issue for more on this topic). In court, statisticians may serve as expert witnesses – but they may also find themselves serving in an entirely different capacity: as a member of a jury.

  By Kelly H. Zou

Crime scene evidenceNews

Evidence of uncertainty: An introduction to our April 2019 special issue

In the heyday of television shows like CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, forensic science seemed not only high-tech and glamorous, but also simple and straightforward. Viewers would watch as the fictional scientists of CSI matched evidence to suspects and suspects to crimes with nary a hint of doubt or uncertainty. However, out in the real world, evidence and conclusions are never so clear cut.

  By Brian Tarran

Writing competitionNews

Enter our 2019 writing competition for early-career statisticians

Are you an early-career statistician with a statistical story to tell? If so, we invite you to enter the 2019 Statistical Excellence Award for Early-Career Writing. The competition is jointly organised by Significance and the Young Statisticians Section of the Royal Statistical Society (RSS) and forms part of the RSS Statistical Excellence Awards programme.

  By Brian Tarran

Writing competition

 

News

Enter our 2019 writing competition for early-career statisticians

Are you an early-career statistician with a statistical story to tell? If so, we invite you to enter the 2019 Statistical Excellence Award for Early-Career Writing. The competition is jointly organised by Significance and the Young Statisticians Section of the Royal Statistical Society (RSS) and forms part of the RSS Statistical Excellence Awards programme.

By Brian Tarran

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