2020Science

Why 2020 is a "magic year"

Let me tell you something: 2020 is a magic year. But what do I mean by that? To explain, grab a calculator and follow these instructions.

By Alan Jackson

2020Science

Why 2020 is a "magic year"

Let me tell you something: 2020 is a magic year. But what do I mean by that? To explain, grab a calculator and follow these instructions.

  By Alan Jackson

Sports

How well did an algorithm perform at the 2019 Rugby World Cup?

My previous Significance article outlined statistical-based forecasts for the 2019 Rugby World Cup (RWC) by Rugby Vision. According to these forecasts, New Zealand were favourites to win the tournament, ...

By Niven Winchester

Sports

The real winner of the last five Rugby World Cups

Now that the dust has settled on the 2019 Rugby World Cup, we can look back and analyze the accuracy of the World Rugby rating system. Before each World...

By Ray Stefani

Rugby ballsSports

How well did an algorithm perform at the 2019 Rugby World Cup?

My previous Significance article outlined statistical-based forecasts for the 2019 Rugby World Cup (RWC) by Rugby Vision. According to these forecasts, New Zealand were favourites to win the tournament, but the All Blacks were convincingly beaten by England in a semifinal, and South Africa were crowned 2019 RWC champions.

  By Niven Winchester

Player catching rugby ballSports

The real winner of the last five Rugby World Cups

Now that the dust has settled on the 2019 Rugby World Cup, we can look back and analyze the accuracy of the World Rugby rating system. Before each World Cup, a great deal of attention is paid to the numerical ratings and the resulting ordinal ranking positions of the World Rugby system, and the ratings are assumed to provide guidance on what to expect in terms of match outcomes.

  By Ray Stefani

V-1 flying bomb explosion over LondonNews

A World War II investigation, updated for the modern era

"In the early morning of 13 June 1944, one week after the D‐Day landings, the Nazi regime launched a new weapon at London. The first Vergeltungswaffe 1 (Vengeance Weapon 1, or V‐1) hit a railway bridge in Mile End, killing six people and leaving 200 homeless. Over the following nine months, more than 2,300 'flying bombs' fell on London, killing an estimated 5,500 people."

  By Brian Tarran

V-1 flying bomb explosion over London

 

News

A World War II investigation, updated for the modern era

"In the early morning of 13 June 1944, one week after the D‐Day landings, the Nazi regime launched a new weapon at London. The first Vergeltungswaffe 1 (Vengeance Weapon 1, or V‐1) hit a railway bridge in Mile End, killing six people and leaving 200 homeless. Over the following nine months, more than 2,300 'flying bombs' fell on London, killing an estimated 5,500 people."

By Brian Tarran

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