Will Self and Mark FrancoisPolitics

The Brexit debate and the prosecutor's fallacy

Politics is, by definition, adversarial. Its systems are designed to bring together people with competing views, so that they might argue over and decide on the “affairs of the cities” – which is the literal translation of the Greek word πολιτικά (Politiká). But, in recent times, politics has felt like it has become more adversarial, more polarised.

By Gianluca Baio

Will Self and Mark FrancoisPolitics

The Brexit debate and the prosecutor's fallacy

Politics is, by definition, adversarial. Its systems are designed to bring together people with competing views, so that they might argue over and decide on the “affairs of the cities” – which is the literal translation of the Greek word πολιτικά (Politiká). But, in recent times, politics has felt like it has become more adversarial, more polarised.

  By Gianluca Baio

Science

Book review: Superior, by Angela D. Saini

“The key to understanding the meaning of race is understanding power,” writes Angela D. Saini. Her new book, Superior, explores the roots of “race science” in the modern world...

By Olivia Varley Winter

Culture

LGBT+ resources for statisticians and data scientists

In professional and classroom settings, we strive to communicate the intention of a respectful and productive interaction. In order to accomplish this, we all need to be mindful of our...

By Donna LaLonde, Wendy Martinez, Jack Miller, Miles Ott and Suzanne Thornton

Superior book coverScience

Book review: Superior, by Angela D. Saini

“The key to understanding the meaning of race is understanding power,” writes Angela D. Saini. Her new book, Superior, explores the roots of “race science” in the modern world. Though it mines human pre-history, it hinges around the major ideological warfare of the 20th century – a time when racial experiments within science were enthusiastically supported in Nazi Germany in its pursuit of policies of “racial hygiene”.

  By Olivia Varley Winter

Pride artCulture

LGBT+ resources for statisticians and data scientists

In professional and classroom settings, we strive to communicate the intention of a respectful and productive interaction. In order to accomplish this, we all need to be mindful of our implicit biases, especially when beginning new professional relationships and establishing learning environments. The resources provided in this article are presented with this very intention.

  By Donna LaLonde, Wendy Martinez, Jack Miller, Miles Ott and Suzanne Thornton

US courtroomScience

Statistics in court: Incorrect probabilities

Although both the law and statistical theory have foundations that rest on formal rules and principles, courts can badly misapply statistical evidence and arguments. In some cases, even when arriving at a correct decision, the courts can accept or give an explanation that is inaccurate and unsound. In other cases, the misuse of statistics has led to false convictions and years of jail time for crimes not committed by the accused.

  By Jim Norton and George Divine

US courtroom

 

Science

Statistics in court: Incorrect probabilities

Although both the law and statistical theory have foundations that rest on formal rules and principles, courts can badly misapply statistical evidence and arguments. In some cases, even when arriving at a correct decision, the courts can accept or give an explanation that is inaccurate and unsound. In other cases, the misuse of statistics has led to false convictions and years of jail time for crimes not committed by the accused.

By Jim Norton and George Divine

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